Faulty ventilation for generator blamed for Raymond, Maine deaths

RAYMOND, Maine (AP) — An investigator say a deteriorated ventilation system for a propane-fueled generator appears to have contributed to the deaths of a Pennsylvania couple who most likely died of carbon monoxide poisoning at their Maine summer home.

The bodies of 85-year-old Lewis Somers III and his wife 84-year-old wife Elizabeth Somers of Lafayette Hill, Penn., were found Tuesday in Raymond. Firefighters found high levels of carbon monoxide in the house.

The Portland Press Herald says Elizabeth Somers was found sitting in a chair in a first-floor bedroom of the two-story house, and Lewis Somers was found in the living room.

Sheriff Capt. Jeff Davis says there were cracks in the flexible metal hose that was being used to vent the fumes from the generator, installed in the basement in the 1980s.

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Information from: Portland Press Herald, http://www.pressherald.com

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Comments

David  Cote's picture

Where's your logic?

So if I decide to overload one of my circuits and that condition starts an electrical fire, does that mean I can sue C.M.P. for damages even though I fully knew my actions created that condition and was not the responsibility of the power source? It's common knowledge it's not safe to run a generator in an enclosed environment within the confines of a livable structure. It's as common as the knowledge we have about the safety of wearing seat belts. If I choose to not wear mine and I get hurt in an accident, does that allow me to sue Nissan? Of course not. And the saddest part of this story is media outlets constantly broadcast reports regarding the proper use of generators and many people ignore the reports. There are also operating manuals that expicitly outline the dangers of improper use of these machines, usually several times through the text. If a consumer chooses to ignore the warnings and tragedy strikes then how can anyone be at fault but the victim? C.M.P. had nothing to do with these tragic deaths. They do not control the weather. They do not control the freewill and decision making of individuals. They provided ample warnings before the storm hit that there would be prolonged power outages. At the onset of the outages C.M.P. said the outages would take several days to repair. Seems pretty clear cut to me. Why doesn't it seem the same way to critics?

 's picture

cmp

you do realise the entire east coast got hit right? normally when there is a problem in one state electric companies will draw workers from nearby states to help. only this time our nearby states are in the same position. mabey you think these companies should train new people in two days? then youd complain about how under trained they are.

KRIS KUCERA's picture

At least they went together

And although it's certainly tragic, at least they went peacefully. May they rest in peace after all those years.

Always gotta blame someeon, right, Dan? Maybe up the medication to 4X daily?

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