Foreman says people still plowing snow across roads in Livermore

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LIVERMORE — Highway foreman Roger Ferland reported to selectpersons Monday that many residents are still plowing snow across the roads, Administrative Assistant Kurt Schaub said.

“Not only is this illegal, it is dangerous and can damage town equipment,” he said.

Ferland reported he hit a massive snow pile recently and broke the plow wing.

Plowing snow across the road is a problem occurring all around town, Schaub said.

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Ferland was advised that he and the highway crew should call the Androscoggin County Sheriff’s Department to report the problems, Schaub said.

Ferland also updated the board on the 2008 GMC plow truck that needs both front axles replaced in addition to the previously reported U-joints.

The anticipated total cost is between $2,000 and $2,500.

Ferland is coordinating repair plans, Schaub said.

O’Connor Motors in Augusta has the wiring harness needed for the truck but has not yet provided a cost to replace it. The truck is still functional and is needed in case of more snow but will be repaired as soon as possible.

Ferland also asked the board if there could be some consideration of how he and the road crew are notified that the roads need to be plowed during the overnight hours, Schaub said.

Ferland told selectpersons that he normally gets up hourly to check weather conditions, which is not ideal if a substantial storm is coming that will keep the crew out for extended periods, Schaub said.

Ferland used to get called out by the Sheriff’s Department but hasn’t had a call from them in a month or more, according to the Ferland, Schaub said.

In towns with police departments, usually the officer on patrol will alert the foreman when conditions get slippery.

The board agreed to give this some further consideration, Schaub said.

Ferland also told the board that he would like to replace the 2005 JCB backhoe/loader with a heavier machine. Voters approved the purchase of the machine in 2005 and it is paid off.

There was some discussion on whether it should be replaced with a new machine or a used machine and possibly buying one from government surplus, Schaub said.

More research is being done to explore the options, he said.

dperry@sunjournal.com

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