Livermore Falls man revived with naloxone after Manchester car crash

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[UPDATE: Police say there’s no evidence Legendre was under the influence of drugs]

AUGUSTA — A Livermore Falls man was administered overdose-reversal medications twice after crashing his car on Prescott Road in Manchester on Saturday morning, authorities said.

Jess Legendre, 31, who was taken by ambulance to MaineGeneral Medical Center for treatment before going to the Kennebec County jail, made a court appearance Monday via video from the Kennebec County jail.

He is charged with operating after habitual offender revocation and falsifying physical evidence, both in connection with the crash.

Superior Court Justice John O’Neil set Legendre’s bail at $1,000 cash or, alternatively, $250 cash with a Maine Pretrial Services supervision contract.

An affidavit filed by Kennebec County Sheriff’s Deputy Jeff Boudreau said Legendre was driving on Prescott Road when the Chevrolet sedan struck a utility pole, broke it and ended up in a ditch.

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Another affidavit by Deputy Jeremy York said Legendre initially showed no signs of being impaired, but became unresponsive as he sat in the passenger seat searching for documents.

“The male’s hands were blue, with a white substance in his right hand,” Boudreau wrote. “The male did not listen to commands but was speaking. His facial reaction was similar to someone who had just woke up from a nap.”

Deputies handcuffed him, and Boudreau said he ran to his cruiser to get a Narcan kit, which contains the overdose-reversal medication naloxone, because Legendre showed symptoms of an overdose. It was administered to Legendre by an emergency medical technician at 10:50 a.m.

York wrote that he found two bags of what appeared to be 48 grams of heroin in the area where Legendre had been rummaging around. Deputies also seized $707 in cash from Legendre’s pockets “due to the close proximity and belief that it was involved with possession and trafficking of the heroin.”

York wrote that rescue personnel found a small chunk of a brown substance in Legendre’s mouth, also believed to be heroin.

York, who followed the ambulance to the hospital, said Legendre refused to have blood drawn by hospital personnel and that at 1:02 p.m., hospital medical staff “had to administer another dose of naloxone to Jess.”

Evidence showed that at the time of the crash Legendre’s driver’s license had been revoked and he had 2009 conviction for operating under the influence and a 2010 conviction for unlawful furnishing of drugs, York wrote.

Jess Legendre

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