Lombardo visited Lewiston in 1949, 1950

0

Dear Sun Spots: During World War II, the Guy Lombardo band played at the Lewiston Armory. I would like to find out what date that was, as there was an article in the Sun on my mother concerning this appearance? I have checked some of the fan clubs with no results. Any clues would be deeply appreciated. Please phone me at 783-1584. – No Name, No Town.

Answer:
Many, many thanks to news assistant Anna Rodrigue, who found the following information for you and other Lombardo fans:

According to the Sun Journal archives, bandleader Guy Lombardo performed at the Lewiston Armory on Thursday, June 23, 1949, and Tuesday, July 25, 1950.

Lewiston Journal articles from June 22, 1949, and July 21, 1950, reported that Lombardo was to arrive at both shows with his Royal Canadians and his complete crew including Carmen and Lebert Lombardo, the Lombardo Trio, Don Rodney, Kenny Gardner and the Twin Pianos, with the exception of Don Rodney not being listed in his 1950 show.

The articles state that Lombardo, one of the most popular band leaders with local fans and an outstanding band director, possesses a terrific personality and is always perfectly groomed, in fact his good grooming is reflected in his musicians, who are often referred to as the best-looking bunch of musicians to be seen anywhere.

Lombardo’s program is described as music of the “timeless” variety and all the numbers played by the orchestra are songs whose popularity has lasted throughout the years, mixed with a few of the new tunes.

The Lombardo rule in presenting a number is stressing melody, playing each selection as a person would sing it, rather than having the number arranged with intricate harmonies. The drums, guitar, pianos and bass are all on the soft side in the Lombardo orchestra.

Lombardo, the creator of “the sweetest music this side of heaven,” died Saturday, Nov. 5, 1977. He was 75 and had led a band for 63 of those years. Besides being tops in music he was also a champion in speed boat racing, having won the International Gold Cup Regatta. He was also a smart businessman and flying enthusiast and once operated the Long Island Airlines.

Some of his biggest hits were “Little White Lies,” “Boo Hoo,” “You’re Driving Me Crazy,” and “Seems Like Old Times.”

“Auld Lang Syne” was the band’s theme song long before Lombardo played it over the air on Dec. 31, 1929, from the Hotel Roosevelt Grill in New York.

Sun Spots thought you might enjoy the following lyrics to “Auld Lang Syne” which literally means “old long since”:

Auld Lang Syne – written by Robert Burns. (Anglicised translation)

Should old acquaintance be forgot

and never brought to mind?

Should old acquaintance be forgot

and auld lang syne?

(chorus)

For auld lang syne, my dear,

for auld lang syne,

we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,

for auld lang syne.

And surely you’ll buy your pint cup!

And surely I’ll buy mine!

And we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,

for auld lang syne.

(chorus)

We two have run about the hills,

and pulled the daisies fine;

But we’ve wandered many a weary foot,

since auld lang syne.

(chorus)

We two have paddled in the stream,

from morning sun till dine (dinner time);

But seas between us broad have roared

since auld lang syne.

(chorus)

And there’s a hand my trusty friend!

And give us a hand o’ thine!

And we’ll take a right good-will draught,

for auld lang syne.

(chorus)

This column is for you, our readers. It is for your questions and comments. There are only two rules: You must write to the column and sign your name (we won’t use it if you ask us not to). Letters will not be returned or answered by mail, and telephone calls will not be accepted. Your letters will appear as quickly as space allows. Address them to Sun Spots, P.O. Box 4400, Lewiston, ME 04243-4400. Inquiries can also be posted at www.sunjournal.com in the Advice section under Opinion on the left-hand corner of your computer screen. In addition, you can e-mail your inquiries to sunspots@sunjournal.com.

Advertisement