Looking Back on February 24

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100 years ago, 1914
(Advertisement) The Atherton Furniture Company is planning extensive changes and alterations on their first floor. These changes include a complete new office department and a large balcony. In this balcony the firm plans to build a suite of large size rooms which will be completely furnished with the most modern home furnishings and will be a show place of great interest to people desiring to furnish a home complete, or only looking for one or two pieces of furniture. In this furnished suite they will see goods just as they will look in the home, and one of the features planned is a modern kitchen with one of the famous Glenwood ranges in full operation.

50 years ago, 1964
The years from 1914 through 1964 will he spanned at the style show which the Patronesses of St. Mary’s General Hospital is sponsoring on March 4 at the Lewiston Memorial Armory. The fifty years of fashions featuring both hair styles and clothing will be directed by Miss Nadine Leveille of the staff at Mr. Bernard’s School of Hair Fashions. Entitled “The Changing Face of Fashion,” Nadine will present 64 models appropriately costumed. Mrs. David Clarke and Mrs. Bert Cote will provide the commentary. One of the show’s highlights will be a wedding scene with gowns from Doris’ Bridal Salon and wedding bouquets of natural flowers from Dube’s Flower Shop.

25 years ago, 1989
As if dozens of marching bands, floats and clowns weren’t enough, WCSH-TV and LA Arts are adding a bit more fun to this year’s Maine State Parade with Mayfest. The outdoor entertainment extravaganza, billed as “a present to the community for years of support and participation,” will serve as both a finale to the sixth annual parade and LA Arts’s 15th anniversary season. Performers for the event, to be staged in downtown Auburn, are in the process of being selected. The television station is sponsoring the festival as a major underwriter for LA Arts. There’s another twist to this year’s parade, which is the largest in Maine. Organizers expect to receive so many entries that the number of participants will have to be limited

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