Looking Back on February 22

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100 years ago, 1918
Fred M. Furbush Jr., 8-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred M. Furbush of Washington street, Auburn, was saved by a chance of good luck yesterday from death by drowning or freezing. He was trying out his father’s snowshoes when he attempted to cross what appeared to be a sheet of ice. It was, however, but a crust of ice and he broke through into the icy water which was above his waist. He was unable to free his feet from the snowshoes and could do nothing to save himself. He was not seen for several minutes and then the crew on a passing train on the Maine Central chanced to see the boy’s plight and stopped to help him out. It was even then some minutes before he could be reached but he kept his courage even though he was chilled through in the extreme cold water, and air as well.

50 years ago, 1968
Approximately 17 tons of grain pellets were dumped onto the Androscoggin River ice by Auburn firemen Wednesday night after the grain reportedly had been ruined by smoke in the railroad car. Auburn firemen were called to the grain unloading ramp off Turner Street at 5:43 p.m. for the fire in the car of grain. Deputy Chief Allen Howard said the fire in the grain resulted from use of a cutting torch to make an opening in the bottom of the hopper when, because of some malfunction, it was impossible to open the hopper chute.

25 years ago, 1993
Appreciation and praise to more than 50 volunteers and students participating in the Lost Valley Handicapped Ski Association program was the focus of recognition on Sunday by co-directors of the program, Chris Chamberlain of Monmouth and Pat Gregoire of Lewiston. Lost Valley owner Fern Pontbriand was honored for his support and hospitality to the volunteer program that provides free ski instruction for the physically challenged. Adaptive equipment and specialized ski instruction is provided by volunteers who give their time teaching a variety of people to experience the fun and freedom of skiing. Fund-raising efforts have provided specialized equipment used to teach disabled persons.

The material in Looking Back is reproduced exactly as it originally appeared, although misspellings and errors made at that time may be corrected.

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