Roof-replacement contract for Gingerbread House to be awarded

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NORWAY — The replacement of the asphalt-shingle roof on the historic Gingerbread House is about to take a step closer to completion.

“We are still in the process of reviewing bids and hope to announce the awarding of the contract on Monday,” said Joan Beal of the Norway Landmarks Preservation Society.

Seven potential bidders gathered at the massive 1851 house on upper Main Street with society member Albert Judd at a prebid meeting in January to walk through the building and discuss what the job will entail. The work is expected to begin as early as April 15 and must be completed by June 15, according to the request for proposals.

According to the bid documents, the work will include replacing shingles on the main house and turret roofs, structural repairs where necessary and flashing. Due to evidence of leakage, it is assumed a small portion of the roof framing and sheathing may require repair, according to the document.

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The work will also include the four-story turret. The iron fence around the top of it is built in sections about 3 feet long and 12 inches tall. It needs to be removed, restored, painted and reattached.

The 80- by 20-foot, two-story Gingerbread House has a gabled roof on its main section with a cross gable next to the turret. The exterior has elaborate millwork.

The Norway Landmarks Preservation Society, doing business as Friends of the Gingerbread House, has been raising money for several years to rehabilitate the 19th century building, including $10,000 for the roof replacement.

Originally known as the Evans-Cummings House, it is more commonly known as the Gingerbread House for its elaborate trim, added in a late 19th century renovation by architect John Hazen.

C’s Inc., a real estate holding company affiliated with Sun Media Group, publishers of the Sun Journal and Advertiser-Democrat, agreed late in 2008 to delay demolition of the building if anyone could figure out a way to move the house. A group of volunteers, the Friends of the Gingerbread House, banded together to save the landmark building.

ldixon@sunjournal.com

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