Turner board hears rescue budgets

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TURNER — More on-call staffing in the Rescue Department would save the town money, Chief Toby Martin told selectmen this week.

Martin presented the board Monday night with two proposals for the 2015 rescue budget. Each included money to staff two ambulances during the day and one ambulance at night and on weekends. Both anticipate department revenues of $270,000.

The first includes more in-house staff and expenditures of $431,587. The second calls for expenses of $400,740 and relies more heavily on on-call staffing. Savings can be achieved if more local emergency medical providers are willing to take on shifts working at Turner Rescue, Martin said.

He said he had only five advanced life support providers from the community.

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Revenues run around $230,00 per year, but he anticipates that figure to rise because of new billing policies and a higher level of service provided by Turner Rescue, he said.

He said his day shifts are fully scheduled, but nights are difficult because on-call providers have other jobs, as well.

Board of Selectmen Chairman Kurt Youland suggested that three people during the day should be sufficient with one ambulance.

No motion was made.

In other business, the board voted to go with Acadia Services for removing mold from the building that houses the rescue and fire chiefs’ office.

Other construction decisions will be discussed in executive session at 3 p.m. Friday. This other construction involves replacing and adding new windows. There is much to be done in the station house if it is to be used for sleeping. Martin said it is not fit for community use in its present state.

He said fundraisers are planned for such things as uniforms. Selectman Ralph Caldwell suggested name plates to wear, so people would have a name to see when rescuers go into homes. The uniforms would have names sewn into them, Martin said.

Town Manager Kurt Schaub said the emergency uniforms that providers wore at accident scenes were no longer usable because of compliance issues.

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