Two seek Franklin County Commission seat

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Franklin County Commission District 3 candidates

Name: Clyde Barker

Address: 17 River St., Strong

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Age: 70

Occupation: Chief civil deputy, Franklin County Sheriff’s Department

Name: Richard M. Stovall

Address: 5 Shadagee Lane No. 9, Phillips

Age: 67

Occupation: Retired

FARMINGTON — Two men are seeking the District 3 seat on the Franklin County Commission in Tuesday’s election.

Commissioner Meldon Gilmore is not seeking re-election. The new commissioner will begin his service on Jan. 1, 2011, for a three-year term.

Clyde Barker, a Republican of Strong, and Richard Stovall, a Democrat of Phillips, want to represent the towns and plantations of Avon, Carrabassett Valley, Coplin, Dallas, Eustis, Industry, Kingfield, Madrid, New Vineyard, Perkins, Phillips, Rangeley, Sandy River, Strong, Temple and Weld.

Barker and Stovall have different opinions on what they feel the major issues facing the county are, and the need to borrow $4.46 million to improve working quarters for county employees.

Barker believes the major issue is the need for new offices for Franklin County employees and an addition to the sheriff’s office for the E911 dispatch center.

Stovall doesn’t believe the county should buy Church Street Commons and expand the Franklin County sheriff’s office. He believes the biggest issue facing Franklin County is the economy and lack of jobs, which affects everything from taxes to schools, he said.

Voters in the county face a $4.46 million bond question on Tuesday that would allow county officials to buy the Commons building, adjacent to the county courthouse, and renovate it to house county government offices, except the District Attorney’s Office. The DA’s office would be moved out of the ground level of the courthouse to the main floor. The bond would also pay for an addition to double the space at the sheriff’s office and to move the communications center into the addition and allow deputies and related services to expand into the space dispatchers vacate. The projects are slated to help alleviate space constraints, environmental problems and security issues in both buildings.

“There are meaningful problems to be resolved here but I do not believe these are problems requiring a $4.65 million solution set,” Stovall said. “If the voters agree, then I will work hard and imaginatively to solve the serious health and safety problems as cost-effectively as possible, with a preference for pay-as-you-go solutions as opposed to borrowing that much money. If voters disagree with me and pass it, then I will treat it as something done before my term to solve problems that arose before my watch and move on to deal with issues and problems over which I would then have an impact.”

Barker believes that the county should move forward with the project and borrow the money.

He has worked at the county courthouse, in the ground level where the emergency management director’s office is and he has worked out of the sheriff’s office as a civil deputy.

He said he sees the need to improve the areas due to the conditions, space and air quality. He also wants to make sure the E911 public safety answering point system stays in the county for emergency response time, he said.

If elected, Barker said he would work hard to improve the relationship between the county and municipalities to help keep taxes down.

Stovall said if elected, he would focus on economic development and smart growth. That would consist “of but would not be limited to positivism and advocacy for small business, encouragement for small businesses by minimizing governmental obstacles and include the provision of openness and fairness in the county bidding/request for proposals and hiring processes,” Stovall said.

He said he believes in frugality, efficiency and forward thinking in county government.

Barker said his years of experience working for the county and in municipal government will be a benefit to the county. He began working for the county in 1963 and served as the emergency management director through the 1998 Ice Storm.

He also has been a selectman for more than 20 years in Strong and Wilton, Barker said.

Stovall believes his experienced leadership as a military officer and commander, management skills developed as contract manager executive for a large electrical contractor will be beneficial to the county.

His “real-world practical, problem-solving skills as owner of a small computer business that evolved into work as a business analyst, then retiring to Maine where I gained insights into public education” will also be a positive, Stovall said. The latter experience occurred when he worked at SAD 43 for two years as a computer technician and laptop-repair instructor.

dperry@sunjournal.com

Pull-out:

Franklin County Commission District 3 candidates

District 3

Bio

Name: Clyde Barker

Street address: 17 River St., Strong

Age: 70

Occupation: Chief civil deputy, Franklin County Sheriff’s Department

Name: Richard M. Stovall

Street: 5 Shadagee Lane No. 9, Phillips

Age: 67

Occupation: Retired

FARMINGTON – Two men are seeking the District 3, three-year term, on the Franklin County Commission on Tuesday, Nov. 2. Current Commissioner Meldon Gilmore is not seeking re-election. The new commissioner will begin his service on Jan. 1, 2011.

Clyde Barker,a Republican of Strong, and Richard Stovall, a Democrat of Phillips, both want to represent the towns or plantations of Avon, Carrabassett Valley, Coplin, Dallas, Eustis, Industry, Kingfield, Madrid, New Vineyard, Perkins, Phillips, Rangeley, Rangeley Plantation, Sandy River, Strong, Temple and Weld.

Barker and Stovall have different opinions on what they feel the major issues facing the county are, and the need to borrow $4.46 million to improve working quarters for county employees.

Barker believes the major issue is the need for new offices for the Franklin County employees and an addition to the sheriff’s office for the E911 dispatch center.

Stovall doesn’t believe the county should buy Church Street Commons and expand the Franklin County sheriff’s office. He believes the biggest issue facing Franklin County is the economy and lack of jobs, which affects everything from taxes to school, he said.

Voters in the county face a $4.46 million bond question on Tuesday that would allow the county officials to buy the Commons building, adjacent to the county courthouse, and renovate it to move county government offices, except district attorneys office, into. The DA’s office would be moved out of the ground level of the courthouse to the main floor. The bond would also pay for an addition to double the space at the sheriff’s office and to move the communications center into the addition and allow deputies and related services to expand into the space dispatchers vacate. The improvement projects are slated to help alleviate space constraints, environmental problems and security issues in both buildings.

“There are meaningful problems to be resolved here but I do not believe these are problems requiring a $4.65 million solution set,” Stovall said. “If the voters agree, then I will work hard and imaginatively to solve the serious health and safety problems as cost-effectively as possible, with a preference for pay-as-you-go solutions as opposed to borrowing that much money. If voters disagree with me and pass it, then I will treat it as something done before my term to solve problems that arose before my watch and move on to deal with issues and problems over which I would then have an impact.”

Barker believes that the county should move forward with the project and borrow the money.

He has worked at the county courthouse, in the ground level where the emergency management director’s office is and he has worked out of the sheriff’s office as a civil deputy.

He sees the need to improve the housing quarters due to the conditions, space and air quality, Barker said. He also wants to make sure the E911 public answering point system stays in the county for emergency response time, he said.

If elected, Barker said he would work hard to improve the relationship between the county and municipalities to help keep taxes down.

Stovall said if elected, he would focus on economic development and smart growth. That would consist “of but would not be limited to positivism and advocacy for small business, encouragement for small businesses by minimizing governmental obstacles and to include the provision of openness and fairness in the county bidding/request for proposals and hiring processes,” Stovall said.

He believes in frugality, efficiency and forward thinking in county government, Stovall said.

Barker said his years of experience working for the county and in municipal government will be a benefit to the county. He began working for the county in 1963 and served as the emergency management director through the 1998 ice storm.

He also has been a selectman for more than 20 years in Strong and Wilton, Barker said.

Stovall believes his experienced leadership as a military officer and commander, management skills developed as contract manager executive for a large electrical contractor will be beneficial for the county.

His “real-world practical problem solving skills as owner of a small computer business that involved into work as a business analyst, then retiring to Maine where I gained I gained insights into public education” will also be a positive, Stovall said. The latter experience occurred when worked at SAD 43 for two years as a computer technician and laptop repair instructor.

dperry@sunjournal.com

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