Dear Sun Spots: The best way to find a hypnosis school in Maine is to contact the National Guild of Hypnotists. The Web site is www.ngh.net. They can also be reached via phone at (603) 429-9438. This organization has a tried and true curriculum and enforces a strict code of ethics. We teach self-hypnosis classes through the Adult Education program in the SAD 9 region. We are certified and registered with the National Guild of Hypnotists. – Dawn and Dennis Jepson, Franklin County Hypnosis Center, Farmington.

Dear Sun Spots: I would like to know when the new 2006 quarters will be out?

Also, I have heard that driver’s licenses may be renewed at our local town office. Is that true? – B.L.B., West Bethel.

Answer: For more information or to keep track of the release dates, check out the Web site at www.usmint.gov. Earmarked for release in 2006 are Nevada, Nebraska, Colorado, North Dakota and South Dakota; in 2007, Montana, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming and Utah; and in 2008, the final year of the program, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona, Alaska and Hawaii. No release dates are available on the Web site, so you and others interested in this program might like to keep track by checking the site periodically.

In the meantime, you might be interested in the following fun facts from the U.S. Mint at www.usmint.gov/kids/index.cfm?FileContents=/kids/coinnews/FunFacts.cfm&page=4:

• The Mint produced its first circulating coins – all $111.78 worth of them – in March 1793. That first batch consisted of 11,178 copper cents. Soon after, the Mint began issuing gold and silver coins as well.

• Not only have coin designs changed over the years, but coin materials have changed too. The first coins were made of either gold, silver or copper. In today’s circulating coins, copper is the only one of the metals still used, and in very small amounts. Nickel and zinc are still used.

• Mint marks show what minting facility your coins came from – “P” for Philadelphia, “D” for Denver, and, for older coins, “S” for San Francisco. This mark can be found to the right of the subject’s face on the obverse side of each circulating coin – with the exception of the “Philadelphia” Lincoln cent, which has no mint mark.

• The Mint’s first gold and silver coins had no denominations on them. Since their designs were the same, the only way to tell them apart was by their size.

Regarding your second question on renewing your driver’s license, Sun Spots checked with the Bethel town clerk’s office, which says you cannot do this. This must be done through the Department of Motor Vehicles. However, there is an online service, Rapid Renewal, (www.informe.org/cgi-bin/bmv/rapid-renewal/rr-0) that allows you to renew your driver’s license or Maine ID card or purchase a replacement driver’s license or ID card at any time, day or night.

For readers interested in this, please note that any Maine, licensed driver with an active digital license, digital motorcycle license or digital motor driven cycle restricted license and any holder of a digital Maine ID card can use this.

This service is not available for commercial driver license holders. Please check the site for more information on eligibility requirements.

You will need your Social Security number, valid credit card (Visa or Mastercard) and printer.

Contact BMV at: (207) 624-9000 ext: 52114 or via e-mail at [email protected], for more information.

This column is for you, our readers. It is for your questions and comments. There are only two rules: You must write to the column and sign your name (we won’t use it if you ask us not to). Letters will not be returned or answered by mail, and telephone calls will not be accepted. Your letters will appear as quickly as space allows. Address them to Sun Spots, P.O. Box 4400, Lewiston, ME 04243-4400. Inquiries can also be posted at www.sunjournal.com in the Advice section under Opinion on the left-hand corner of your computer screen. In addition, you can e-mail your inquiries to [email protected]


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