Ward 2 candidates Robert Hayes, left, and Timothy MacLeod, sit side-by-side at a recent candidates forum. Andree Kehn/Sun Journal Buy this Photo

ROBERT HAYES

Occupation: Retired from local retail/wholesale business, having been manager/owner of J.L.Hayes/Agway

Education: Auburn public schools, Union College (B.S., industrial economics), Navy Supply Corps School, University of Southern Maine (B.A., business management).

Family: With wife, Bonnie, raised two children, daughter Gretchen and son Ben.

Political Experience: Auburn Planning Board (member ’77-’90, chairman ’88-’90), Lewiston Downtown & Development Corp. (director ’80-’87, chairman ’85-’87), Auburn City Council (Ward 2: ’05-’15 and ’18-’19).

Q: Why do you think you’re the most qualified, or best candidate for this seat? 

A: As a candidate I feel very qualified, having been a long-term Auburn property owner (both residential and business), a local business manger/owner, and an involved Auburn citizen over the past 40 years. Prior to returning to Auburn after years away to school and for Naval service, I worked as a community/regional planner with a Portland-based engineering/land-use consulting company.

Q: Please name three issues that you believe are critical to Auburn’s future, and how you would address them.

A: 1st issue: Resolution of proper use of lands within the Agriculture and Resource Protection Zone. The issue will be resolved recognizing the need for emphasizing and supporting appropriate natural resource related activities and continuing to limit remote and scattered residential development.

2nd issue: Continued protection of water quality, particularly for L/A’s domestic water supply source Lake Auburn, but also for Auburn’s second major water body, Taylor Pond, which offers recreational uses and waterfront residential development. Land use protection and zoning provisions will continue to be of utmost importance.

3rd issue: Insuring the full and appropriate build-out of the new Edward Little High School project and the realization of the total facility as a community asset and center. Auburn municipal and school department staff and all elected officials will have to cooperatively develop appropriate governance over the common center for education and community activity, recognizing that, foremost, it is an educational center.

Q: What do you like about the city budget passed this year, and what don’t you like?

A: The budget allowed a minimum impact on real estate taxes, but did not adequately allow for the necessary maintenance and/or replacement of capital assets.

TIMOTHY MACLEOD

Occupation: 340B Analyst, Motorcycle Safety Instructor

Education: Edward Little High School graduate, A.S. in photography (UMA), A.S. in general studies (CMCC), B.A. in business administration (UMPI)

Family: Wife: Tracie; daughter: Lucy

Political experience: I have no previous political experience.

Q: Why do you think you’re the most qualified, or best candidate for this seat? 

A: I bring a unique perspective to the current issues facing our city. The city can be better and do better for its residents. I want to expand on current programming to make Auburn fulfill the potential that it has as a leading city in Maine.

Q: Please name three issues that you believe are critical to Auburn’s future, and how you would address them.

A: Food scarcity/poverty/homelessness — We should be more involved in helping those around us and removing the negative stigma. The city has bountiful resources and as a community we need to do better for those in need. We should be partnering more closely with organizations that help solve these problems and bring new programs into our city to help address these issues as needed.

Education — A new high school is coming which is fantastic, however without systemic changes this would be the same as handing a new car to a new driver and thinking it will make them a better driver. This systemic change is needed in order to help our students grow from preschool through high school. It takes more than a new facility to help our students fulfill their learning potential.

Balancing economics with services — If we want a city that is going to attract new families to move and live here, we need to find a balance that allows this without the full gentrification of Auburn. Some examples for aiding in this goal would be to add solar power, public high speed internet, and electric car charging stations.

Q: What do you like about the city budget passed this year, and what don’t you like?

A: The budget passed and we chose to invest in our education system. The state share was higher, which meant that we kept our taxes in check. We should be looking for ways to better spend the money we have, while growing our tax base by making Auburn a place people want to raise a family.


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