FARMINGTON — Third grade Cascade Brook School students were introduced to the Wonders of the Human Body Thursday, Nov. 21 through a series of captivating, hands-on lessons taught by University of Maine at Farmington early education students.

Without a sense of sight, Cascade Brook School third grade student Alyssa Rowe, at left, waits to figure out what object University of Maine at Farmington student Allie Cox will place in her hand. Dee Menear/Franklin Journal Buy this Photo

As CBS students rotated through 10 stations, they learned about blood, the difference between seeing and perceiving, explored different levels of blindness and more.

At the “What’s in your blood” station, students learned what blood is made of and what its purpose is in the body. Each student was given a cup of water with yellow food coloring, which represented plasma.

They added salt which served as the minerals in blood. Next, students added Cheerios dyed red. The cereal acted as red blood cells. Students reacted with awe as they mixed the “cells” into the “plasma” and it turned red.

“Woah! Cool,” said Evan Sanville.

Univeristy of Maine at Farmington student Taylor Burke, center, helps Cascade Brook School third grade students Natalie Hart, left, and Evan Sanville add “red blood cells” to “plasma” during the Wonders of the Human Body science fair Thursday, Nov. 21. Dee Menear/Franklin Journal Buy this Photo

“Each drop of blood has millions of red blood cells,” explained UMF student Rylee Godsoe.

Mini marshmallows and small pieces of purple felt were added to give a visual of white blood cells and platelets.

At the “What do you sense” station, students experienced what it would be like living without one of their senses. One task challenged blindfolded students with identifying objects by touch and taste.

University of Maine at Farmington student Emi Higgins talks about the digestive system with Cascade Brook School third grade students at the Wonders of the Human Body science fair Thursday, Nov. 21. Dee Menear/Franklin Journal Buy this Photo

Models of the lungs were made of paper bags, straws and masking tape at the “Exploring the Lungs” station. After students made the models, they filled them with air and talked about the functions of lungs.

Other stations focused on the heart, eyes, hands, digestive system and skeleton.

The college students are enrolled in the K-8 science teaching for elementary education course taught by Carole Lee, associate professor of science education.

“My students have held an energy fair for fourth grade students for the last seven years,” Lee said. “Last year, the third grade teachers said they were interested in a similar fair for their students.”

The energy fair will be held in the spring, she said.

“Before this, students gave nutrition lessons to the third grade class,” she added. “This is their wrap-up. My students created their lessons for the Wonders of the Human Body science fair. The lessons they are teaching today were peer-reviewed in class first so we could give feedback.”


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