Projects include rebuilding a stone stairway, correcting social trails to define the main trail, and installing stepping stones. SUBMITTED PHOTO

PHILLIPS — Join the High Peaks Alliance (HPA) on June 22 from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. for Trail Stewardship on the Fly Rod Crosby Trail (FRCT). The HPA’s Recreation Ranger, Matt Kusper will be leading volunteers to complete a few projects.

“Volunteers can meet us at the Cascade Stream Gorge Trailhead, where we’ll hike to the FRCT trail after a safety briefing. We’re hoping to tackle three projects; rebuilding a stone stairway, correcting social trails to define the main trail, and installing stepping stones; each project offers varying degrees of physical difficulty allowing volunteers to choose,” says Kusper. “We’ve scheduled a second Trail Clean-up Day on August 24 on another section, if you can’t make it on the 22nd.”

Volunteers should dress for the weather, and wear sturdy, close-toed footwear, and long pants. Bring work gloves and eye protection if you have them and enough water and a snack to get you through the day. Bug spray and sunscreen are highly recommended. Tools will be provided, and we will have extra work gloves handy.

The FRCT is managed and coordinated by the High Peaks Alliance. HPA is seeking year-round volunteer trail stewards to care for sections ensuring the trail’s sustainability and accessibility for all. Contact Matt Kusper at (704) 877-5567 or  Matt@highpeaksalliance.org for more information.

Maine’s most famous outdoorsman was Phillips native, Cornelia “Fly Rod” Crosby, a late 18th-century six-foot-tall superwoman of the woods. Crosby was Maine’s first registered guide, the only documented shooter of caribou in Maine, and a fly-fisher extraordinaire who wrote, lectured, and demonstrated her talents in the wild. Her impact propelled Western Maine as “The Nation’s Playground,” (a term she coined), which, in turn, has brought millions of outdoor recreational enthusiasts to the state over the decades. The FRCT pays tribute to the woods she once frequented, Phillips to Rangeley, where she learned to fly fish, and hunt.

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