LOS ANGELES (AP) – Some pharmaceutical companies are telling their employees to look out for the scruffy guy in the baseball cap.

The Los Angeles Times reported Wednesday that at least six drug companies have released internal communications telling employees to be wary of filmmaker Michael Moore.

Moore’s targets have included General Motors (“Roger & Me”), the gun lobby (the Oscar-winning “Bowling for Columbine”) and President Bush (“Fahrenheit 9/11”).

Moore, normally seen sporting a beard and a ball cap, has now set his sights on the health care industry, including insurance companies, HMOs, the Food and Drug Administration and drug companies.

“We ran a story in our online newspaper saying Moore is embarking on a documentary and if you see a scruffy guy in a baseball cap, you’ll know who it is,” said Stephen Lederer, a spokesman for Pfizer Global Research and Development.

In September and October, Wyeth, AstraZeneca and GlaxoSmithKline, the second-largest in retail sales, sent out Moore alerts, instructing employees that questions posed by the media or filmmakers should be handled by corporate communications.

Heavyweights Sanofi-Aventis Pharmaceuticals and Synthelabo sent similar memos before their recent merger.

Letterman visits troops

David Letterman brought his late-night show to Marines serving in Iraq on Friday, loosening up the Camp Taqaddum crowd with the line, “Anybody here from out of town?”

Letterman brought along musical director Paul Shaffer, stage manager Biff Henderson, comedian Tom Dreesen and the band Off the Wall.

When hands flew in the air in response to requests for a volunteer to help deliver the opening monologue, he asked: “Isn’t that how you got here?”

With the help of cue cards held by an Army soldier, Letterman ran off a series of crowd-pleasers:

“Iraqi elections are in January. Hurry up and pick somebody so we can get the hell out of here,” he said.

And: “If I wanted to face insurgents I would’ve spent Christmas with my relatives.”

Letterman has repeatedly featured Marines on “The Late Show.”

“Paul and I were in Afghanistan three years ago, and last year we were in Baghdad,” Letterman told the crowd. “We wouldn’t want it any other way. We’re sorry we keep having to come back. If you ever come to New York City, come see us and we’ll treat you like big shots.”

The Marines, most of who have been deployed since late summer, welcomed the visit.

“It was great, all of the Marines getting together having a good time,” said Gunnery Sgt. Ronald Trignano, 32, a tech-controller with Communication Squadron 48. “It almost makes you forget where you are for a little while.”



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