AUBURN – New books have been added to the Auburn Public Library shelves for March.

Fiction

“Strivers Row,” Kevin Baker. In the final installment of Baker’s New York trilogy, the life of Jonah Dove, heir to one of Harlem’s great church dynasties, intersects with young Malcolm Little’s, who will later become Malcolm X.

“Intuition,” Allegra Goodman. Goodman’s novel presents an insightful look at a high-stakes research institute in Boston, where the progress of science, political pressures and the ethics of the individuals who work there frequently come into conflict.

“The Old Wine Shades: A Richard Jury Mystery,” Martha Grimes. A strange tale heard in a pub about the disappearance of a mother, her autistic son and their dog sets Inspector Jury off on his latest case despite his suspension from Scotland Yard.

“Sea Change,” Robert B. Parker. Jesse Stone, former L.A. cop and now chief of police in Paradise, Mass., finds himself embroiled in a disturbing case when the partially decomposed body of a divorced heiress washes up on shore.

“Rebels of Ireland,” Edward Rutherford. In the second and final installment of his Dublin saga, Rutherford captures Irish history, from the disastrous revolt of 1534 to the birth of the Irish Free State in 1922, through the lives of a motley cast.

Nonfiction

“Through a Howling Wilderness: Benedict Arnold’s March to Quebec, 1775,” Thomas A. Desjardin. The state historian of Maine recounts how the intrepid young general led troops through Maine in winter to launch a surprise attack on the British.

“Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the Color of Disaster,” Michael Eric Dyson. A prominent observer of African-American social issues charges that this natural disaster exposed the shameful neglect of America’s urban poor.

“Piece of Cake: A Memoir,” Cupcake Brown. In this gritty memoir, the author describes how she escaped a childhood of sexual abuse, drug addiction and gang activity to get sober and become a successful lawyer.

“Quebec, 1850-1950,” Lionel Koffler. Many Twin Cities’ forebears emigrated from the farmlands of rural Quebec. The joys and struggles of life there at that time are vividly portrayed.

“Jim Cramer’s Real Money: Sane Investing in an Insane World,” Jim Cramer. The television financial guru preaches that, with a little time and effort, anyone can successfully manage their own investments. Here he explains how.

“Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time,” editors of Rolling Stone. Selections in this colorful coffee table book will please about any popular music fan.

Children’s

“The King of Mulberry Street,” Donna Jo Napoli. The adventure story based on Napoli’s family history describes the harsh early life of a 9-year-old Italian Jewish boy who manages to get to America after becoming separated from his family. For readers in grades five to nine.

“Broken Song,” Kathryn Lasky. The adventure story based on Lasky’s family history features a 15-year-old Russian Jewish boy who escapes to freedom in Poland and joins a revolutionary movement. For readers in grades five to eight.

“Children’s Songbag,” Paul Dubois and Jennifer Swender. The spiral-bound songbook features songs with guitar chords on the left and tidbits about each song, including a recipe or two, on the right. For kids in preschool through grade three.

“I Could Do That! Esther Morris Gets Women the Vote,” Linda Arms White. Young Esther knows she can accomplish anything she puts her mind to, which helps her as an adult to persuade Wyoming territory legislators to give women the right to vote. For children in grades kindergarten to two.

“Young Hans Christian Andersen,” Karen Hesse, illus. by Erik Blegvad. The illustrated biography tells the story of the real-life ugly duckling, who was born poor and disdained but became cherished later in life for his remarkable stories. For children in grades two to four.


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