ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — The Tampa Bay Rays are still afloat in the AL division series.
Jose Lobaton hit a solo home run with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning into the giant fish tank beyond the center-field wall, and Tampa Bay staved off elimination once again by beating the Boston Red Sox 5-4 Monday night.
The Rays cut Boston’s lead in the best-of-five series to 2-1. Game 4 is Tuesday night at Tropicana Field, with Jake Peavy starting for the Red Sox against Jeremy Hellickson.
Tampa Bay took a win-or-go-home game for the fourth time in nine days. The Rays did it with an unlikely stroke as Lobaton, who came off the bench late in the game, connected against Red Sox closer Koji Uehara.
“It’s unbelievable. It’s something you can’t explain,” Lobaton said. “We never give up. We’re going to keep fighting.”
Back home after two weeks on the road, the Rays gave a sellout crowd of 33,675 little to cheer until Evan Longoria homered on his 28th birthday. Longoria’s three-run shot off Clay Buchholz with two outs in the fifth rallied Tampa Bay to a 3-all tie.
Pinch-hitter Delmon Young, who has a penchant for driving home key runs in October, put the Rays ahead 4-3 with an RBI grounder in the eighth.
The Red Sox tied it in the ninth against Rays closer Fernando Rodney. Dustin Pedroia’s RBI grounder made it 4-all.
Rodney got the win when Lobaton homered to right-center, into the 10,000-gallon tank where cownose rays swim around.
Uehara did not give up a home run in his final 37 regular-season appearances.
The Rays won three must-win road games in three cities over four days just to get into the division series, so they felt good about their chances of coming back against the Red Sox.
Especially with Alex Cobb on the mound. The right-hander beat Cleveland 4-0 in the AL wild-card game last Wednesday and has been one of the consistent pitchers in the majors since August 2012.
The Red Sox were just as confident about the prospect of closing out the series.
Buchholz, limited to 16 starts this season because of a neck strain that landed him on the disabled list for three months, beat the Rays twice this year while allowing no runs and five hits in 13 innings. He also entered his second career postseason appearance with a 2.26 ERA in nine career starts at Tropicana Field.
Cobb settled down after a shaky first inning in which he gave up a leadoff single to Jacoby Ellsbury, hit a batter with a pitch and walked David Ortiz. But the Red Sox got only one run out of it, when second baseman Ben Zobrist made a throwing error while trying to turn a double play.
Cobb, celebrating his 26th birthday, retired eight in a row before walking Ortiz leading off the fourth. Mike Napoli followed with a single for the second hit off Cobb, yet Boston was unable to take advantage.
Ortiz tagged and went to third on Daniel Nava’s fly ball, then was nearly caught too far off the bag when Jarrod Saltalamacchia struck out and catcher Jose Molina threw to third base trying to pick off Ortiz. The inning ended with Stephen Drew hitting a grounder back to Cobb.
The Rays wasted opportunities against Buchholz, too.
James Loney doubled off the left-field wall to begin the second inning, but was erased when Desmond Jennings lined to first baseman Mike Napoli, who threw to second and doubled off Jennings.
The Rays loaded the bases on two walks and Loney’s second hit of the night, but Buchholz escaped the jam by fanning Matt Joyce.
Buchholz wasn’t as fortunate in the fifth, when Yunel Escobar beat out an infield single and David DeJesus doubled with one out. Ben Zobrist popped to shortstop, bringing up Longoria, who became the second player in major league history to homer during the postseason on his birthday.
Willie Mays Aikens homered twice for Kansas City on his birthday Oct. 14, 1980, against Philadelphia in Game 1 of the World Series.
Longoria’s homer was his ninth in 109 career postseason at-bats.
Loney had three hits off Buchholz, who allowed three runs, seven hits and struck out five in six innings.
Ellsbury scored Boston’s first two runs, on Zobrist’s throwing error in the first and Cobb’s wild pitch in the fifth. Ortiz’s fifth-inning RBI single put the Red Sox up 3-0 against the Tampa Bay starter.
NOTES: Rays rookie RF Wil Myers left before the eighth inning because of cramping in both legs. Myers took an awkward swing on a foul ball in the seventh and grabbed the area around his left calf. He limped back to the dugout after striking out for the third out. Myers went to right field after the inning, then headed back to the infield and was met by a team trainer. The club said Myers received IV fluids. DH Matt Joyce replaced Myers in right field.ered to right-center field.
Boston’s lucky charm
When a tired Boston Red Sox team was on the West Coast in August, Jake Peavy was walking to the ballpark in San Francisco when something caught his eye.
Inside a smoke shop was a 3-foot wooden Indian.
The pitcher initially kept walking, but soon stopped.
“My heritage is American Indian,” Peavy said Monday. “I kind of looked back and he was still looking at me. I did a U-turn and I went in and asked how much he cost. We did some negotiating and I carried him on to the ballpark.”
Several key Red Sox were injured at the time, and Peavy made up an elaborate story about how the statue’s spirit had healing powers.
Even though Boston lost to the Giants that day, things soon turned around and the “Chief” became a clubhouse fixture both home and away.
“He’s holding some cigars in his hand,” Peavy said. “When we do hopefully reach our goal, we’re going to smoke those cigars.”
And just like several Red Sox players, Peavy said, “Chief” also now has a beard.
Postseason Puig
Yasiel Puig is finding out for the first time just how exacting the playoffs can be.
The Los Angeles Dodgers rookie was 6 for 13 with two RBIs and four runs scored going into Game 4 of the National League division series Monday night against Atlanta.
“There is a lot more focus and more intensity on every little detail,” Puig said through a translator. “I noticed that each pitcher is focusing more on each pitch that he throws. Everyone’s trying to give their all in every single play.”
The 22-year-old Cuban outfielder was hitting .462 in the postseason following his breakout performance after getting called up from the minors in early June. Puig credited his teammates for helping him mature over the last few months.
“I give a lot of thanks to them for helping me concentrate and focus on the details I need to focus on to make sure I’m always giving it my best,” he said.
Zim’s playoff zen
Tampa Bay senior adviser Don Zimmer is amazed that the low-budget Rays are in the playoffs for the fourth time in six years.
“It’s some organization, I’ll tell you that,” said Zimmer, who is completing his 65th year in baseball and is part of his 19th postseason team.
Zimmer joined the Rays in 2004 after a successful run from 1996-2003 as the bench coach for New York Yankees manager Joe Torre, a stretch that included four World Series titles.
“I’ve been here 10 years and I never saw this coming,” Zimmer said.
Zimmer has influenced many in baseball, including close friend and Yankees manager Joe Girardi, who played on the 1989 NL East champion Chicago Cubs that Zimmer managed.
Girardi, whose contract expires at the end of October, has talked with Yankees officials about a new deal. In addition, the Cubs and Washington Nationals are thought to have serious interest in Girardi to fill open managerial spots.

“He’s in a pretty good spot,” Zimmer said. “Well-deserved. A very brilliant guy, a smart man and a good manager.”

Zimmer thinks Girardi could make a decision in the next few days.

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