Kayci Cass, right, soaks up the sun Monday morning while floating in Middle Range Pond in Poland as her daughter, Cydney, 10, stands on the shoulders of her father, Patrick. The family from Auburn often come to the small roadside access point off Schellinger Road, one of the few free places left to park and access a local body of water. (Russ Dillingham/Sun Journal)

LEWISTON — Though the temperatures in central Maine are not breaking records this week, they are still dangerously high.

The National Weather Service issued a heat advisory and an air quality alert for most of Maine for Monday into Tuesday afternoon.

“With low temperatures in the 90s and high humidity, the heat index value is close to 100 degrees,” National Weather Service Meteorologist Derek Schroeter said.

The heat index, according to National Weather Service, is a measure of how hot it feels when relative humidity is factored in with the actual air temperature.

While the conditions are certainly oppressive, Schroeter said they are not uncommon for this time of year.

He said the temperatures are not setting records, but they are high enough to warrant a warrant an advisory.

The heat and humidity are expected to lessen late Tuesday afternoon into Wednesday morning, when there is a strong likelihood of thunderstorms.

“Excessive heat and humidity are fuel for thunderstorms,” Schroeter said, “so we’re watching for that.”

Until then, Schroeter said, it is best to exercise caution and keep activity to a minimum.

The air quality alert is in effect until 11 p.m. Tuesday, and the heat advisory until 7 p.m. Tuesday.

According to the National Weather Service, the combination of hot temperatures and high humidity create a higher chance for heat illnesses.

To avoid problems such as heat exhaustion, experts recommend drinking plenty of fluids and staying in air conditioned areas.

Those who must work outdoors in oppressive heat and humidity should take frequent breaks in shaded or air conditioned areas.

Kayci Cass, right, soaks up the sun Monday morning while floating in Middle Range Pond in Poland as her daughter, Cydney, 10, stands on the shoulders of her father, Patrick. The family from Auburn often come to the small roadside access point off Schellinger Road, one of the few free places left to park and access a local body of water. (Russ Dillingham/Sun Journal)


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