Carrie Langevin of Portland Country Club, a Winthrop resident, hits onto the seventh green during the final round of the Maine Women’s Amateur Golf Tournament in Kennebunk on Wednesday. Derek Davis/Portland Pres s Herald

KENNEBUNK — As Carrie Langevin watched Jordan Laplume enforce her will on hole after hole at Webhannet Golf Course Wednesday, the chorus of Alicia Keys’ “Girl on Fire” kept running through her hear.

What the 18-year old Laplume was doing, with five birdies in Wednesday final round of the Maine Women’s Amateur Golf Championship was so impressive, Langevin didn’t care that it came at her expense.

“Honestly, I felt like it was her time. Obviously I wanted to win. I had a great round (Monday). But (Laplume) came so close last year. I felt like it was her tournament to win this year. I was so happy for her,” Langevin, a Winthrop resident, said. “She had five birdies. It was beautiful to watch.”

Langevin, 53, began Wednesday’s second and final round (Tuesday was washed out due to rain, making this a 36-hole tournament rather than 54) with a one-stroke lead over both Laplume and Minot’s Kristin Kannegieser. Langevin didn’t play poorly Wednesday. Her 78 was tied for the third-best round of the day. But Laplume played so well, shooting a 3-under par 69 for the round to finish at minus-1, the only player in the field under par, that Langewin knew her second-place showing and senior title were a job well done.

“That just kept going through my mind. Jordan was on fire,” Langevin said.

After moving to Winthrop seven years ago, Langevin was encouraged by her friend Melissa Johnson to enter the Maine Women’s Amateur tournament. This year was Langevin’s sixth time in the tournament, and her best finish.

“(Johnson) plays in this tournament every year. I was more of a country club golfer. She was like, ‘Why aren’t you playing in this other stuff?’ She kind of gave me the nudge I needed,” Langevin said.

Langevin finished in ninth place in the Maine Am last year at Rockland Country Club. She was in contention until late in her second round, when she took a seven on hole No. 16 and an eight on 17. Langevin played well down the stretch Wednesday, although those two holes weren’t far from the surface of her memory.

“If you’re having a good round in any tournament, that’s always in the back of your mind, lurking. At least in my mind. You try to keep the demons away and keep positive thoughts,” she said.

By and large, Langevin didn’t need to work too hard to fend off the demons Wednesday. Laplume overtook Langevin early, but with a birdie on No. 6, Langevin tied Laplume for the lead. On 16, a strong approach shot from the right set Langevin up for par. While she bogeyed 17, Langewin knew it could’ve been worse.

“I was almost out of bounds. I had tree limbs. I had no approach shot. I was actually toying with going back into the fairway. I decided to just try to keep it low,” Langevin said.

Langevin finished her round with a solid par on 18.

Last year, Langevin played in the U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur Championship in Vero Beach, Florida, and estimated she plays in around 10 competitive matches per year, including those at her club, Portland Country Club. Now that she’s played a few Maine Women’s Amateur tournaments, Langevin knows the annual event scratches a competitive itch.

“I’ve always been a competitor. I played competitive tennis when I was a youth. I just have that competitive spirit, I guess,” Langevin said. “This just feels like the real deal. It’s so well run. The women really know what they’re doing in organizing a tournament. Every shot counts. It’s not like you can say I’m going to pick up. I’m at my max. I’m amazed and pretty awed this many women come down here and compete.”


Only subscribers are eligible to post comments. Please subscribe or to participate in the conversation. Here’s why.

Use the form below to reset your password. When you've submitted your account email, we will send an email with a reset code.

filed under: