AUBURN — Ne-Do-Ba and the Androscoggin Historical Society announce the donation of artifacts and archives from Ne-Do-Ba.  Ne-Do-Ba is a nonprofit corporation founded in 1997 by Nancy Lecompte, who has published under the pen name of Canyon Wolf.  Ne-Do-Ba, which means “friends” in the Abenaki language, is dedicated to researching and disseminating the history of the Wabanaki peoples of western Maine and the Androscoggin River Valley.

For nearly a quarter century, Lecompte has been uncovering lost truths about the first nation and assisting individuals in genealogical research.  The collection she has amassed is an invaluable asset to the society and will expand its ability to provide accurate information about the culture that flourished in the area for 11,000 years before being supplanted by undocumented immigrants.

In addition to the physical items being donated, Lecompte has given the society a library of books related to the Wabanaki and other indigenous peoples, as well as the website she has created and curated: www.nedoba.org.  The information contained in the website will be incorporated in the society’s site at www.androhist.org.

Because of restrictions occasioned by the coronavirus, the transfer occurred at the society’s West Auburn Schoolhouse, corner of Boothby Street and West Auburn Road. Lecompte and Penelope Jessop, vice president of the Androscoggin Historical Society, met outside to effect the transfer of assets and discuss their utilization in the future.  Jessop, a life-long teacher, was interested in the educational aspects of the collection, which includes hands-on materials intended to provide a greater understanding of native cultures to school-age people.


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