KINGFIELD — Both new and familiar faces welcome residents at the Webster Hall town office.

Selectmen have hired new employees and reassigned current employees to new positions.

Leanna Targett, former town clerk and treasurer, was appointed to fill the administrative assistant position. Former Deputy Clerk Erica Bracy moved into Targett’s position, and she also will continue to serve as deputy treasurer.

Newly hired town Treasurer Emily Hatfield also will serve as Bracy’s deputy clerk. Previously employed at Camden National Bank, Hatfield lives in town and brings her Camden National Bank financial training and skills to the position.

Tom Marcotte, the new code enforcement officer and plumbing inspector, plans to be at the town office or on property sites Tuesdays, but he also can be reached other days through the town office, according to Targett.

Selectmen began their preliminary review of the budget Monday night, agreeing on suggestions to offer the budget committee later this month. Most of the proposed options manage to keep the projected 2013-14 budget nearly the same as this year.

The Fire Department payroll will increase by $2,400, because Chief Doug Twitchell has been convinced to take a pay increase, according to Targett.

“His pay has been the same for 12 years,” she said.

Costs for paving have taken a jump over the past decade. Public Works director Bruce White said he now needs to spend $10,000 for tar and presented a spreadsheet to explain the increase in cost. In 2000, he spent $28.25 per square yard to pave a section of town road. The cost jumped to $43.50 per square yard in 2005, and again in 2011 to $73.50. Prices have since climbed beyond that to a 160 percent increase. White wanted selectmen and taxpayers to know he’s not spending frivolously.

“We have a rotation schedule to repave road sections every 10 years,” he said. “Now we can only afford to pave a third of that same road section on what we spent 10 years ago.”

Costs to maintain town vehicles have also risen steadily. White said he shops carefully for everything, especially for tires. He also said he spends nearly $1,000 each year replacing street signs because people steal them. Signs with popular names like “Princess Street” are commonly sought-after targets, he said.

Replacement costs are $90 per sign, and he has to allocate many work hours to repair and replace them. He hasn’t solved the problem of sign theft, but he has changed the sign poles to ones that better survive vandalism.

Selectmen reluctantly agreed that the tradition of hand-delivering town reports to taxpayers was not the best use of office staff’s limited time. Reports will now be delivered to local grocery stores and other frequently visited sites. Targett said she will continue to deliver reports to seniors or those who are not able to leave their homes.

Selectmen reviewed changes in Bryan Fitch’s wastewater budget and applauded the progress to make the system pay for itself through self-generated revenue.

“This looks like you’re about $5,000 below last year,” board Chairwoman Heather Moody told Fitch. “This is the first year in history that it has been self-sufficient.”

This week, ratepayers will have received their first bill that reflects the recently approved increase. Targett said her office staff is prepared to field phone calls from those who might not have known about the changes.

Although no group has stepped forward to organize Kingfield Days, leftover money will be in a separate reserve account until volunteers gather to develop a plan. Selectmen agreed that voters could decide at the June 15 town meeting to continue to contribute to the account if they wish. Eliminating the option to contribute could send a message to residents that the Kingfield Days celebration was permanently discontinued.

The bicentennial committee is a separate group and will have its own funds and account.

Selectmen also noted that publicity about the May 19 Sugarloaf Marathon has announced that the 31st annual race expects to end at the ball park in the center of town. Property owner Richard Keenan recently donated approximately four acres of the former Joneco Mill site to the town for recreational use, so the town currently is responsible for the property.

“No one has called us to check on that,” Moody noted. “Mr. Keenan told them last year that he no longer would be the property owner in 2013.”

The marathon draws hundreds of runners from all over the U.S. and Eastern Canada. Competitors start in Eustis, travel through Carrabassett Valley and end in Kingfield. Property owners had complained to selectmen that last year’s race drew fans who walked through their yards, dropped litter on the streets and blocked traffic. Moody said the race coordinator contact at Sugarloaf was no longer working there, so they should locate the new contact and work on those details.

By Valerie Tucker

Special to the Sun Journal

KINGFIELD — Both new and familiar faces welcome residents at the Webster Hall town office.

Selectmen have hired new employees and reassigned current employees to new positions. Former town clerk and treasurer Leanna Targett was appointed to fill the administrative assistant position. Former deputy clerk Erica Bracy moved into Tagett’s position, and she also will continue to serve as deputy treasurer. Newly hired town treasurer Emily Hatfield also will serve as Bracy’s deputy clerk. Previously employed at Camden National Bank, Hatfield lives in town and brings her Camden National Bank financial training and skills to the position. Tom Marcotte, the new code enforcement officer and plumbing inspector, plans to be at the town office or on property sites on Tuesdays, but he also can be reached on other days through the town office, according to Targett.

Selectmen began their preliminary review of the budget on Monday night, agreeing on suggestions to offer the budget committee later this month. Most of the proposed options manage to keep the projected 2013-2014 budget nearly flat.

The fire department payroll will increase by $2,400, because Chief Doug Twitchell has been convinced to take a well-earned pay increase, according to administrative assistant Leanna Targett.

“His pay has been the same for 12 years,” she said.

Costs for paving have taken a jump over the past decade. Public works director Bruce White said he needs to spend $10,000 for tar, but he presented a spreadsheet to explain his cost increases. In 2000, he spent $28.25 per square yard to pave a section of town road. He spent $43.50 in 2005, and $73.50 in 2011. With prices climbing beyond that 160 percent increase, he wanted selectmen and taxpayers to know he’s not spending frivolously.

“We have a rotation schedule to repave road sections every 10 years,” he said. “Now we can only afford to pave a third of that same road section on what we spent ten years ago.”

Costs to maintain town vehicles have risen steadily also, and White says he shops carefully for everything, especially for vehicle tires. He also explained that he spends nearly $1,000 each year replacing street signs, because people steal them. Signs with popular names like Princess Street are the commonly sought-after targets, he said. Replacement costs are $90 per sign, and he has to allocate many work hours to repair and replace them. He hasn’t solved the problem of sign stealing, but he has changed the sign poles to ones that are more able to survive the vandalism.

Selectmen reluctantly agreed the tradition of hand-delivering town reports to taxpayers was not the best use of office staff’s limited time. Reports will be delivered to local grocery stores and other popularly-frequented sites. Targett said she will continue to deliver reports to seniors or those who are not able to leave their homes.

Selectmen reviewed changes in Bryan Fitch’s wastewater budget and applauded the progress to make the system pay for itself through self-generated revenue.

“This looks like you’re about $5,000k below last year,” board chair Heather Moody told Fitch. “This is.first year in history that it has been self-sufficient.”

This week, rate payers will have received their first bill that reflects the recently-approved increase, and Targett said her office staff is prepared to field phone calls from those who might not have known about the changes.

Although no group has stepped forward to organize Kingfield Days, so the remaining budget dollars will remain in a separate reserve account until volunteers gather to develop a plan. Selectmen agreed that voters could decide at the June 15 town meeting to continue to contribute to the account if they wish. Eliminating the option to contribute could send a message to residents that the Kingfield Days celebration was discontinued permanently. The bicentennial committee is a separate group and will have its own funds and account.

Selectmen also noted that publicity about the May 19 Sugarloaf Marathon has announced that the 31stannual race expects to end at the ball park in the center of town. Property owner Richard Keenan recently donated approximately four acres of the former Joneco Mill site to the town for recreational use, so the town currently is responsible for the property.

“No one has called us to check on that,” Moody noted. “Mr. Keenan told them last year that he no longer would be the property owner in 2013.”

The marathon draws hundreds of runners from all over the U.S. and Eastern Canada. Competitors start in Eustis, travel through Carrabassett Valley, and end in Kingfield. Property owners had complained to selectmen that last year’s race drew fans who walked through their yards, dropped litter on the streets, and blocked traffic. Moody said the race coordinator contact at Sugarloaf was no longer working there, so they should locate the new contact and work on those details.


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