For 20 years, I promoted February as Black History Month and held dozens of civil rights rallies with the children I worked with through the inner-city ministry The Jesus Party. I must say, though, that all the promotion of Black Lives Matter really gets under my skin — and I am not talking about my white skin.

As a country, there have never been as many black Americans in political office. They dominate the music industry, as well as many professional sports. For God’s sake, there is a black family living in the White House.

I try to fall in line and support whatever leadership the country decides on, but I feel that since President Obama has been in office, he has done more to divide then to unite.

I don’t believe anyone should ever be mistreated, by anyone, for any reason.

What about the red-head in fourth grade being called carrot top? What about the teenager with braces being called jaws? What about the overweight or underweight person? Those who go through life being picked on because of acne or a lisp? What about someone gay who is taunted? How about the mentally challenged being left out? Don’t forget religious persecution.

It goes on an on, because the issue is not with any one group of people. The real issue is hate.

We cannot legislate the way people think, but I am committed to handshakes and smiles.

The Rev. Douglas Taylor, Lewiston


Only subscribers are eligible to post comments. Please subscribe or to participate in the conversation. Here’s why.

Use the form below to reset your password. When you've submitted your account email, we will send an email with a reset code.

filed under: